SAGE Sociology

Toralf Zschau and Daniel Hatch discuss their article on the application of a new network-based framework of recovery capital in Drug Courts.

Direct download: JASS_Drug_Courts_Edit.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 5:38pm EST

Author Jacob Day discusses his article which investigates the effects of job-level, task-based, segregation on racial differences in promotions to executive positions within the college football coaching profession.

Direct download: WOX_Footbal_Edit.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 2:15pm EST

Author Chana Teeger discusses her article, "Both Sides of the Story: History Education in Post-Apartheid South Africa," published in the December 2015 issue of the American Sociological Review

Direct download: Chana_Teeger._completed.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 5:18pm EST

Author Dr. Madonna Harrington Meyer discusses her innovative, award-winning book, "Grandmothers at Work: Juggling Families and Jobs." Meyer explains her methodology for conducting the study, as well as surprising conclusions and future research. The book was reviewed in the December 2015 issue of Gender & Society

Direct download: Madonna_HM._completed.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 6:33pm EST

Author Ning Hsieh discusses her article, "Economic Security, Social Cohesion, and Depression Disparities in Post-Transition Societies: A Comparison of Older Adults in China and Russia," which can be found in the December 2015 issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior. 

Direct download: Ning_Hsieh._complete.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 4:00pm EST

Author Eran Shor discuss his article, "A Paper Ceiling: Explaining the Persistent Underrepresentation of Women in Printed News," which was co-authored by Arnout van de Rijt, Alex Miltsov, Vivek Kulkarni, and Steven Skiena, and was published in the October 2015 issue of American Sociological Review.

 

Abstract:

In the early twenty-first century, women continue to receive substantially less media coverage than men, despite women’s much increased participation in public life. Media scholars argue that actors in news organizations skew news coverage in favor of men and male-related topics. However, no previous study has systematically examined whether such media bias exists beyond gender ratio imbalances in coverage that merely mirror societal-level structural and occupational gender inequalities. Using novel longitudinal data, we empirically isolate media-level factors and examine their effects on women’s coverage rates in hundreds of newspapers. We find that societal-level inequalities are the dominant determinants of continued gender differences in coverage. The media focuses nearly exclusively on the highest strata of occupational and social hierarchies, in which women’s representation has remained poor. We also find that women receive greater exposure in newspaper sections led by female editors, as well as in newspapers whose editorial boards have higher female representation. However, these differences appear to be mostly correlational, as women’s coverage rates do not noticeably improve when male editors are replaced by female editors in a given newspaper.

 

Read the article here.

Direct download: ASR_Shor.wav
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 1:46pm EST

Lisa Jean Moore discusses her paper “A Day at the Beach: Rising Sea Levels, Horseshoe Crabs, and Traffic Jams”, with Sarah Neal, Editor of Sociology. Posted October 2015.

Direct download: Lisa_Jean_and_Sarah_Nealwebready.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 7:23am EST

Maryam Griffin examines transportation politics and the Freedom Rides in Palestine in the context of a strategic shift in which Palestinian resistance has de-prioritised leader-centered negotiations in favour of grassroots mobilisation that directly appeals to international civil society.

Direct download: Griffin_RC_Radio_8.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 7:40am EST

Robbie McVeigh argues that, with demographic change in Northern Ireland, racist violence has become one of the principal manifestations of unionist unease. The state's reaction to racism has been to tolerate a level of acceptable violence. People of colour and migrant workers in NI, he argues, have been 'living the peace process in reverse'.

Direct download: McVeigh_RC_Radio_8.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 7:26am EST

Victoria Brittain considers the legacy of Ken Saro-Wiwa's struggle against the ecological destruction of his homelands wrought by Shell.

Direct download: Race__Class_radio_Victoria.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 7:01am EST

Eddie Bruce-Jones speaks about police brutality against non-white Germans, examining a series of controversial deaths in custody and arguing for the need to identify patterns of institutional racism. Posted September 2015.

Direct download: RC_radio_Eddie_Bruce_Jones.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 6:43am EST

Interview with A. Sivanandan by Avery Gordon for the 2013 Historical Materialism conference. Posted September 2015.

Direct download: SivaHMConFFinal_copy.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 6:12am EST

Ann Oakley discusses her paper “Interviewing Women Again: Power, Time and the Gift”, with Kath Woodward, Editor of Sociology. Posted September 2015.

Direct download: Kath_Woodward_and_Ann_Oakley_webready.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 5:18am EST

Author Jen-Hao Chen discusses his article "Marriage, Relationship Quality, and Sleep among U.S. Older Adults," which was coauthored with Linda J. Waite, and Diane S. Lauderdale, and appears in the September 2015 of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

 

Abstract:

Sleep is a restorative behavior essential for health. Poor sleep has been linked to adverse health outcomes among older adults; however, we know little about the social processes that affect sleep. Using innovative actigraphy data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (N = 727), we considered the role of marriage, positive marital relationship support, and negative marital relationship strain on older adults’ (ages 62–90) self-reported and actigraph-measured sleep characteristics. We found that married older adults had better actigraph-estimated but not self-reported sleep characteristics than the unmarried. However, among the married, those who reported more negative aspects of their marital relationship reported more insomnia symptoms, with the association reduced when psychosocial characteristics were added to the model. The married who reported more positive aspects of their marital relationship showed better actigraph-estimated sleep characteristics; taking characteristics of the physical and mental health and home environment into account reduced this association.

Read the article here.

Direct download: JHSB_Chen.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 2:57pm EST

Author Elnur Gajiev discusses his poem, "Men of Mountains," which was published in the August 2015 issue of Humanity & Society.

Read the poem here.

Direct download: HAS_Gajiev2.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 5:16pm EST

Author William Pridemore discusses his article "The Mortality Penalty of Incarceration: Evidence from a Population-based Case-control Study of Working-age Males" which was published in the June 2014 issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Abstract:

There is a growing body of research on the effects of incarceration on health, though there are few studies in the sociological literature of the association between incarceration and premature mortality. This study examined the risk of male premature mortality associated with incarceration. Data came from the Izhevsk (Russia) Family Study, a large-scale population-based case-control design. Cases (n = 1,750) were male deaths aged 25 to 54 in Izhevsk between October 2003 and October 2005. Controls (n = 1,750) were selected at random from a city population register. The key independent variable was lifetime prevalence of incarceration. I used logistic regression to estimate mortality odds ratios, controlling for age, hazardous drinking, smoking status, marital status, and education. Seventeen percent of cases and 5 percent of controls had been incarcerated. Men who had been incarcerated were more than twice as likely as those who had not to experience premature mortality (odds ratio = 2.2, 95 percent confidence interval: 1.6–3.0). Relative to cases with no prior incarceration, cases who had been incarcerated were more likely to die from infectious diseases, respiratory diseases, non–alcohol-related accidental poisonings, and homicide. Taken together with other recent research, these results from a rigorous case-control design reveal not only that incarceration has durable effects on illness, but that its consequences extend to a greater risk of early death. I draw on the sociology of health literature on exposure, stress, and social integration to speculate about the reasons for this mortality penalty of incarceration.

Read the full article here.

Direct download: JHSB_Pridemore.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 7:25pm EST

Author Amanda Gengler discusses her article "“I Want You to Save My Kid!” Illness Management Strategies, Access, and Inequality at an Elite University Research Hospital" which was published in the August 2014 issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Read the article here.

Direct download: JHSB_Gengler.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 2:16pm EST

Authors Shannon Wooden and Ken Gillam discuss book Pixar's Boy Stories: Masculinity in a Postmodern Age, which was reviewed by Tristan S. Bridges in the August 2015 issue of Gender & Society.

Read the review here.

Direct download: GAS_Wooden.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 7:19pm EST

Judith Levine discusses her book, "Ain’t No Trust: How Bosses, Boyfriends, and Bureaucrats Fail Low-Income Mothers and Why it Matters," which was reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Gender & Society.

Read the review here.

Direct download: GAS_Levine.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 6:47pm EST

Author Liberty Barnes discusses her book "Conceiving Masculinity: Male Infertility, Medicine, and Identity," which was reviewed in the August 2015 issue of Gender and Society.

Read the review here.

Direct download: GAS_Barnes2.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 5:01pm EST

Author Richard Miech talks about his article "The Sequencing of a College Degree during the Transition to Adulthood: Implications for Obesity" which was published in the June 2015 issue of JHSB.

Read the full article here.

Direct download: JHSB_Miech.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 3:53pm EST

Author Eileen Otis discusses her book "Markets and Bodies: Women, Service Work, and the Making of Inequality in China" which was reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Gender & Society

Read the review here.

Direct download: GAS_Otis.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 2:03pm EST

Race & Class Radio         Program no. 6                    3 December 2014

On Wednesday 3 December 2014 No Alibis hosted Race & Class Radio, a quarterly program featuring highlights of the current issue of the internationally known journal Race & Class published by SAGE and produced by the Institute of Race Relations in London.  The October – December 2014 issue is a Special Issue on “Memory and hope: new perspectives on the Kashmir conflict.”  We spoke with Guest Editor Shubh Mathur and contributors Gowhar Geelani and Noor Ahmad Baba.

Gowhar Geelani is a journalist, columnist and former editor of Voice of Germany, Deutsche Welle (00—7:55)

Noor Admad Baba is Professor of Political Science at the University of Kashmir, Srinagar and former Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences (7:56 – 16:34)

Shubh Mathur is an Indian anthropologist and the author of The Everyday Life of Hindu Nationalism (16:35—24:24)

 

 

Race & Class Radio is produced by Avery Gordon and Elizabeth Robinson for No Alibis, a public affairs radio program that airs weekly on KCSB 91.9 FM Santa Barbara California from 9-11 am PST and webcasts at www.kcsb.org.

Posted May 2015

Direct download: AirCheck_WEDNESDAY_02_11_2015_10.mp3
Category:Sociology, Ethnic Studies -- posted at: 10:35am EST

Race & Class Radio         Program no. 6                    3 December 2014

On Wednesday 3 December 2014 No Alibis hosted Race & Class Radio, a quarterly program featuring highlights of the current issue of the internationally known journal Race & Class published by SAGE and produced by the Institute of Race Relations in London.  The October – December 2014 issue is a Special Issue on “Memory and hope: new perspectives on the Kashmir conflict.”  We spoke with Guest Editor Shubh Mathur and contributors Gowhar Geelani and Noor Ahmad Baba.

Gowhar Geelani is a journalist, columnist and former editor of Voice of Germany, Deutsche Welle (00—7:55)

Noor Admad Baba is Professor of Political Science at the University of Kashmir, Srinagar and former Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences (7:56 – 16:34)

Shubh Mathur is an Indian anthropologist and the author of The Everyday Life of Hindu Nationalism (16:35—24:24)

 

Race & Class Radio is produced by Avery Gordon and Elizabeth Robinson for No Alibis, a public affairs radio program that airs weekly on KCSB 91.9 FM Santa Barbara California from 9-11 am PST and webcasts at www.kcsb.org.

 

Posted May 2015

Direct download: AirCheck_WEDNESDAY_02_11_2015_09.mp3
Category:Sociology, Ethnic Studies -- posted at: 10:30am EST

Race and Class Radio is a quarterly programme featuring highlights of the internationally known journal Race and Class, published by Sage and produced by the Institute of Race Relations in London. From the July-September 2014 issue we focus on the IRR's report on race-related deaths since the Macpherson report, with IRR News editors Harmit Athwal and Jon Burnett, and on California farm worker struggles with Sociology Professor Adrian Cruz.

Direct download: Athwal_Burnett_Race_Class_Radio_5_final.mp3
Category:Sociology, Ethnic Studies -- posted at: 5:55am EST

Cynthia Enloe discusses her book, "Seriously! Investigating Crashes and Crises as if Women Mattered," which was reviewed in the April 2015 Gender & Society. Read the review here.

Direct download: GAS_Enloe.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 5:34pm EST

  • Fran Shor, Professor of History at Wayne State University, discusses the racialized social system in the United States. Posted September 2012.

Author Anna Mueller discusses her article, "Suicidal Disclosures among Friends: Using Social Network Data to Understand Suicide Contagion," written with co-author Seth Abrutyn, which was published in the March 2015 issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Abstract: A robust literature suggests that suicide is socially contagious; however, we know little about how and why suicide spreads. Using network data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, we examine the effects of alter’s (1) disclosed and (2) undisclosed suicide attempts, (3) suicide ideation, and (4) emotional distress on ego’s mental health one year later to gain insights into the emotional and cultural mechanisms that underlie suicide contagion. We find that when egos know about alter’s suicide attempt, they report significantly higher levels of emotional distress and are more likely to report suicidality, net of extensive controls; however, alter’s undisclosed suicide attempts and ideation have no significant effect on ego’s mental health. Finally, we find evidence that emotional distress is contagious in adolescence, though it does not seem to promote suicidality. We discuss the implications of our findings for suicide contagion specifically and sociology more generally.

Read the article here.

Direct download: JHSB_Mueller.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 5:49pm EST

William Tabb explains the ways the Regulation School has influenced his Structures of Accumulation approach, anjd discusses the important ways politics, culture, technology, and debt come together to impact the current forms of austerity and inequality evident in the US and elsewhere.

Direct download: Podcast_with_W_K_Tabb_-_part_1.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 7:35am EST

William Tabb discusses the challenges of the mobilization of social movements such as Occupy Wall Street, and explains the problematic nature of non-hierarchical forms of resistance to contemporary, corporate capitalism before concluding with a description of his current work.

Direct download: Podcast_with_W_K_Tabb_-_part_2.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 11:29am EST

Professor David Fasenfest of Wayne State University (critical.sociology@gmail.com), discusses his role as the editor of Critical Sociology. Fasenfest describes the widespread changes he has overseen in his years as the editor including but not limited to: a more international readership, the expansion of the editorial board, a broader outreach in social media, a broadening of the substantive scope of the journal's content, and the inclusion of the journal on the Social Sciences Citation Index. He also discusses some of the challenges faced by editors of academic journals in today's era of widespread budget cuts to higher education. Additionally, Fasenfest explains ways in which readers/listeners can get more involved in the journal.

Direct download: Podcast_with_D_Fasenfest.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 11:14am EST

Author Jeff Sallaz talks about his article, "Permanent Pedagogy: How Post-Fordist Firms Generate Effort but Not Consent," published in the February 2015 issue of Work and Occupations.

Abstract: We lack a compelling account of the post-Fordist labor process. When firms can no longer provide secure jobs at good pay, how do they motivate workers? Rather than areturn to despotism, this ethnography of call center work documents a novel system of indirect control. New employees are rushed onto the production floor, where their lack of preparation discomfits them and motivates them to play an autonomous learning game. Although initially generative of effort, the game is difficult to master and offers few rewards for sustained participation. Intense effort and high attrition coexist, a management system that the author labels permanent pedagogy.

Read the article here.

Direct download: WOX_Sallaz.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 6:36pm EST

Authors Timothy O'Brien and Shiri Noy discuss their article, "Traditional, Modern, and Post-Secular Perspectives on Science and Religion in the United States," which was published in the February 2015 issue of American Sociological Review.

Abstract: Using General Social Survey data, we examine perspectives on science and religion in the United States. Latent class analysis reveals three groups based on knowledge and attitudes about science, religiosity, and preferences for certain religious interpretations of the world. The traditional perspective (43 percent) is marked by a preference for religion compared to science; the modern perspective (36 percent) holds the opposite view. A third perspective, which we call post-secular (21 percent), views both science and religion favorably. However, when faced with competing accounts of events such as creation and evolution, post-seculars root their views in religion rather than in mainstream science. Regression models indicate that perspectives on science and religion do not simply mirror other denominational or ideological differences. Furthermore, religio-scientific perspectives shape attitudes about political issues where scientific and some religious communities diverge, including on abortion rights and stem cell research. Overall, most individuals favor either scientific or religious ways of understanding, but many scientifically inclined individuals prefer certain religious accounts. This suggests that public divisions related to science and religion are cultural and epistemological. This article underscores the complexity of the boundary between reason and faith and highlights the roots of political conflict in perspectives on science and religion in the United States.

Read the article here.

Direct download: ASR_OBrien_Noy.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 5:03pm EST

Author Catherine Tan discusses her article, "'Two Opposite Ends of the World': The Management of Uncertainty in an Autism-Only School," which she and co-author Gil Eyal recently published in the Journal of Contemporary Ethnography.

Abstract: How do individuals maintain a sense of efficacy and purpose in the face of high levels of ambiguity and uncertainty? In research on medical uncertainty, sociologists often discuss the strategies health practitioners employ to control uncertainties relating to diagnosis and treatment. Over six months of ethnographic field work at an autism-only therapy school, we observed seventy-five students and forty-seven instructors and formally interviewed ten instructors and four parents. While other studies on medical uncertainty have focused on controls over external circumstances, we demonstrate that another management strategy is for individuals to perform ethical work on themselves in order to adjust how they conduct themselves in uncertain situations. Despite the ambiguity of both the autism diagnosis and the therapeutic method employed at the school, instructors are able to maintain a sense of efficacy and to recognize themselves as “doing floortime” by transforming themselves to become “child directed.”

Read the article here.

Direct download: JCE_Tan.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 7:00pm EST

Janet Shim, Sara Ackerman, and Katherine Weatherford Darling discuss their article, "Race and Ancestry in the Age of Inclusion: Technique and Meaning in Post-Genomic Science," published in the December 2014 issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Abstract: This article examines how race and ancestry are taken up in gene-environment interaction (GEI) research on complex diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. Using 54 in-depth interviews of 33 scientists and over 200 hours of observation at scientific conferences, we explore how GEI researchers use and interpret race, ethnicity, and ancestry in their work. We find that the use of self-identified race and ethnicity (SIRE) exists alongside ancestry informative markers (AIMs) to ascertain genetic ancestry. Our participants assess the utility of these two techniques in relative terms, downplaying the accuracy and value of SIRE compared to the precision and necessity of AIMs. In doing so, we argue that post-genomic scientists seeking to understand the interactions of genetic and environmental disease determinants actually undermine their ability to do so by valorizing precise characterizations of individuals’ genetic ancestry over measurement of the social processes and relations that differentiate social groups.

Read the article here.

Direct download: JHSB_Shim_Ackerman_WeatherfordDarling.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 12:15pm EST

Author Melissa Lavin discusses her article "If You Want It, You Can Get It Right Here: Space and Drug Use in Strip Clubs" published in the May 2014 issue of Humanity & Society.

Abstract: There is a burgeoning body of sociological literature that focuses on strip clubs and the club actors therein; most notably, strippers. Most of this scholarly work has emphasized interactions between strippers and customers, the deployment of stigma management strategies in order to neutralize deviantizing interactions and identities, gender performances and hierarchies, power, inequality and social control, and socialization processes associated with becoming dancers. While scholars have paid some attention to drugs and alcohol in the locale, they have paid little attention to how drug and alcohol use relates to the spatial organization and material culture of the strip club, the relationship between stigma and where club actors use illicit drugs, and how using certain drugs contributes to discreditable identities of already stigmatized workers. By centralizing accounts of setting actors through interviewing to supplement my complete participant fieldworker role, I build ideas about context-specific drug and alcohol use, power, and the ecology of drugs.

 

Read the full article here.

Direct download: HAS_Melissa_Lavin.mp3
Category:Sociology -- posted at: 7:00pm EST

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